The key to a perfect cup of tea? Milk first, say some daft scientists

Goodness me. Has it come to this? After some incredible discoveries in the past few centuries like penicillin, atoms, microchips, dark matter floaty things and all that – Science has DARED to infringe on the subject of TEA making once again. And their suggestion is nothing short of terrifying. You should pop the kettle on and read this whilst sitting comfortably.

Yes, these so-called “Scientists” dare to suggest the milk goes in BEFORE the hot water! Scandalous.

Actually, they said the same nonsense some 11 years ago according to The Guardian:

After months of research the Royal Society of Chemistry has announced the answer to a question that for generations has shattered households, sundered friendships, splintered relationships: the milk should go in first. It is all to do with denaturing milk proteins, according to Dr Andrew Stapley, a chemical engineer from Loughborough University.

Dr Stapley was arrested soon after this study was published and has spent the last 11 years in the Tower of London. But he steadfastly refuses to budge on the subject. Makes you sick, doesn’t it?

Every Brit knows the perfect drinking temperature of 60C (140F) is achieved six minutes later boiling – but after 17 minutes and 30 seconds the tea will be past its best as it falls below 45C (113F). The formula, created by scientists at the University of Northumbria, is: TB + (H2O at 100C) 2mins BT + C (10ml) + 6mins BT = PC (at OT 60C).

TB = tea bag; BT = brewing time; C = milk; PC = perfect cuppa; OT = optimum temperature.

Or, in other words, the milk comes AFTER the hot water. After. Oh and it should come with scones. And jam. And a nice Union Jack tablecloth. Just to make it official and all that.

Settled? I bloody hope so.

Blimey! is your daily dose of British news and features for anglophiles everywhere! This article was carefully written by Tim Holt, a British blogger, photographer and actor based back in the UK after many years of living in America. Forever torn between two magnificent slices of sod.
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